Bucktown Store, Cambridge
Visit Dorchester

Discover Maryland's African-American History

Find out why Maryland is the most powerful Underground Railroad story-telling destination in the world.

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Bucktown Store, Cambridge
Visit Dorchester

From the hidden locales along The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, to the site of Frederick Douglass' escape at Baltimore's President Street Station, discover Maryland's significant role in America's struggle for equality. Trace the story of freedom on historic byways across scenic Maryland landscapes.

 

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The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, Caroline and Dorchester Counties
Harriet Tubman Mural
Jill Jasuta

At the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center and State Park visitors become immersed in Tubman’s world through informative, evocative  exhibits. Drive the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway to explore the secret network of trails, waterways and safe houses used by enslaved people fleeing north to escape slavery and visit sites along the byway where Harriet's life unfolded

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Explore Maryland's Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center

Visitors enjoy interactive and immersive exhibits at the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center.

Hidden in Maryland’s landscapes are the stories of hundreds of freedom seekers who risked their lives to escape slavery. Full of courage and inspiration, more people successfully fled from bondage in Maryland than from any other state.
 

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Frederick Douglass Driving Tour, Eastern Shore, Annapolis and Baltimore
Black and White Painting of Frederick Douglass

Regarded as one of America’s most prominent and influential orators, abolitionists, statesmen and chroniclers of the slavery experience, Frederick Douglass was born on a farm on the Eastern Shore. Discover the real Frederick Douglass in the places that shaped him on a driving tour that starts on the Eastern Shore and takes you through Annapolis and Baltimore.
 

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African American Heritage Tour, Annapolis
Kunte Kinte - Alex Haley statue in Annapolis
Watermark

Trace the journey of African Americans, and explore their impact both nationally and internationally with Annapolis Tours℠ by Watermark®. Developed in partnership with the Kunte Kinte-Alex Haley Foundation and named a “Heritage Award Winner” by the Four Rivers Heritage Area, this 2-hour African American Heritage walking tour starts at Market House Park across from Annapolis City Dock, where slave ships entered 300 years ago. The Alex Haley statue that marks the significance of the author of Roots and the journey of his ancestor Kunte Kinte are featured. 

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Banneker-Douglass Museum, Annapolis
Banneker Douglass Museum
Banneker Douglass Museum

The Official State of Maryland Museum of African American heritage provides exhibits and collections that improve the understanding and appreciation of America’s rich cultural diversity.  The Permanent Exhibit, "Deep Roots, Rising Waters: A Celebration of African Americans in Maryland," provides an overview of African American history in Maryland from 1633 through present day. Visit and discover how African Americans throughout Maryland made lasting changes affecting all Americans.

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The Reginald F. Lewis Museum, Baltimore
Reginald-F-Lewis-Museum Building Exterior
Courtesy of Jane Yoon

The museum's permanent collection is a gateway to the history and living culture of Maryland's African Americans. The collection includes art, artifacts, textiles, material culture, photographs, rare books and other items. Some of the largest collections focus on African American military experience, early American jazz recordings, and Maryland community history.

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National Great Blacks in Wax Museum, Baltimore
National Black Wax Museum Image

The National Great Blacks In Wax Museum is among the nation's most dynamic cultural and educational institutions. Because it is a wax museum committed solely to the study and preservation of African American history, it is also among the most unique. Life-size, life-like wax figures highlight historical and contemporary personalities of African ancestry. Harriet Tubman, Benjamin Banneker. Billie Holiday, and other national figures, chronicle the history of African people from around the globe. The replica of a slave ship complete with Middle Passage history is among one of the most stirring experiences anywhere.

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Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park, Baltimore
exhibit in museum

Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park is an educational and national heritage site that highlights African-American maritime history.

This waterfront museum in Baltimore’s Fells Point neighborhood showcases the lives of Maryland natives Frederick Douglass and Isaac Myers, important contributors in African-American maritime history. Through a self-guided tour you’ll learn about Douglass’s time working on the docks as an enslaved child before escaping to freedom in New York, and about Myers, a free-born African-American labor leader and one of the founders of the Chesapeake Marine Railway and Dry Dock Company.

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Josiah Henson Park, North Bethesda
Josiah Henson Park
Montgomery Parks

Visit this site where Reverend Henson lived and worked until he escaped slavery to Canada, established a community for fugitive slaves and continued to work as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. His true-life stories inspired Harriet Beecher Stowe’s ground-breaking book Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

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Oakley Cabin African American Museum and Park, Olney
Oakley Cabin African American Museum and Park
Montgomery Parks

From 1880-1920, this living-history museum on a two-acre tract of land served as the center of an African-American roadside community that housed both black and white residents who sold produce and handmade items to travelers. Today, furnishings depict the various stages of its history, and artifacts that were excavated onsite are also on display.

Network to Freedom Guide

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Maryland's Underground Railroad Guide

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